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  HOME »  STORMWATER PROGRAM »  NPDES Stormwater Permit
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NPDES Stormwater Permit:

Current NPDES Stormwater Permit
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NPDES Stormwater Permit PDF Download     Current NPDES Stormwater
Permit (530.26 kb).

Download it here.
 
Adobe Acrobat Download     Need Acrobat?
Download it here.


Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination Program
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Illicit Discharge

Illicit discharges are nonstormwater discharges that are not allowed under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Sanitary wastewater, car wash wastewaters, improper oil or radiator flushing disposal, laundry wastewaters, and improper disposal of auto and household toxics are examples of illicit discharges that can be the source of pollution to NCDOT's stormwater drainage system and local streams. NCDOT staff members are trained to recognize and report these discharges to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources for enforcement action. You can help too by reporting these types of discharges to NCDOT.



Stormwater System Inventory and Prioritization Program
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Inventory Prioritization Program NCDOT maintains an inventory of its roadway system and sensitive waters of the state that is based on geographic information systems. This inventory allows NCDOT to prioritize locations for potential best management practices based on roadway and water quality attributes. NCDOT also tracks the location of outfalls from the Department's industrial facilities.


BMP Retrofit Program
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BMP Retrofit Program The NPDES Stormwater Permit requires NCDOT to have a Best Management Practice (BMP) Retrofit Program. A BMP is a structural (detention basin) or a nonstructural (pollution prevention plan) technique known to be the most effective and practical method of controlling stormwater pollution in a specific area. The Retrofit Program applies or installs BMPs into the existing highway facility. NCDOT has constructed and will continue to construct BMPs across the state to improve water quality.


BMP Toolbox for Post-Construction Runoff
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BMP Toolbox for Post-Construction Runoff The NCDOT Best Management Practice (BMP) Toolbox will be developed during the first year of the second term permit. The objective of this Toolbox is to identify and standardize the most effective structural measures for addressing stormwater runoff. The Toolbox will include site selection, design criteria, and construction specifications. The development of the BMP Toolbox will be coordinated with NCDENR Division of Water Quality and the academic and research community.


BMP Inspection and Maintenance Program
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Maintenance Yard

Stormwater best management practices (BMPs) can be highly effective at removing pollutants from incoming runoff. However, all BMP structures require regular maintenance to continue functioning properly over time.

NCDOT is in the process of implementing a BMP Inspection and Maintenance Program to assist with the ongoing maintenance needs of all BMPs. The objective of this program is to keep the BMPs in good operating condition to achieve maximum pollutant removal. NCDOT will develop a BMP Inspection and Maintenance Manual that will include written procedures outlining the inspection and maintenance requirements for stormwater BMPs. After the completion of this manual, appropriate training and program development will occur to maintain BMPs.



Post-Construction Runoff Control Program
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BMP Toolbox for Post-Construction Runoff Through the Post-Construction Runoff Control Program, NCDOT is implementing the BMP Toolbox and the BMP Inspection and Maintenance programs to protect water quality and minimize post-construction impacts. This program will incorporate watershed strategies and permit requirements from other sections of NCDOT's permit to create a comprehensive and sustainable program.


Vegetation Management Program
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Vegetation Managmenet

How we treat roadside vegetation can greatly improve the quality of stormwater runoff from our highways. The Highway Stormwater Program is particularly interested in (1) pesticide and fertilizer use, and (2) mowing techniques. For example, using a chemical that has a minimum residual effect on the environment, such as a biodegradable chemical, will benefit roadside plant species. NCDOT currently works with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and local universities to determine which pesticides and fertilizers to use and the appropriate amount to apply on roadside vegetation. NCDOT will train its vegetation managers to select vegetation management activities that minimize the amount of pollution carried off in stormwater.

Proper management of roadside vegetation is a crucial aspect of highway safety, with the greatest priorities being hazard-free safety clear zones, low vegetation in the operational zones, and high visibility on the roadways. To achieve highway safety in an environmentally sound way, vegetation managers at NCDOT have adopted an integrated pest management (IPM) program for roadside vegetation. The IPM program includes the following components: plant selection and management, vegetation and pest monitoring, pest biology and ecology, and pesticide selection and usage.



Encroachment Program
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Encroachment Program

The Encroachment Program is a strong example of the commitment of both NCDOT and NCDENR to cooperate for the benefit of water quality and the environment. NCDOT is ensuring that any discharger requesting to connect to its stormwater drainage system has authorization to discharge from NCDENR, such as through the NPDES permit. These dischargers who work with NCDOT and NCDENR are not considered illicit discharges as discussed in the Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination System. If you plan to discharge into the NCDOT stormwater drainage system, you may wish to contact the respective District Engineer in your Division. Contact List.



Construction Program
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Highway Construction

The NCDOT is committed to, and actively promoting and addressing protection of, the state's surface waters from pollutant runoff from construction activities. The department implemented a sediment and erosion control program for construction activities in 1970, three years prior to the state regulation in 1973. In February 1991, the North Carolina Sedimentation Control Commission (SCC) and DLR delegated the authority to NCDOT to administer its own sediment and erosion control program within the jurisdiction of its activities. This progressive program requires preparing erosion control plans, implementing and maintaining standard specifications and project-special provisions, and monitoring active work sites for compliance with the Sedimentation Pollution Control Law.

Borrow pits and waste piles are special aspects of construction activities where NCDOT continues to support research at local North Carolina universities to develop new methods to improve water quality impacts. Please see the Research Program for more details.



Industrial Activities Program
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Industrial Activities Program

The Industrial Activities (IA) Program is responsible for ensuring that NCDOT is in compliance with the NPDES Stormwater Permit requirements as they apply to NCDOT's industrial facilities. These industrial facilities include maintenance yards, rail yards, and ferry terminals in all 14 NCDOT Divisions in North Carolina. Each facility is required to have a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SPPP) in place because activities conducted at the site, such as equipment fueling and maintenance, pesticide and fertilizer storage, waste disposal, and salt and de-icing chemical storage, could potentially contribute pollutants to the storm drainage system if they are not properly managed. The SPPP outlines best management practices (BMPs) that minimize stormwater pollution. NCDOT field staff are trained to be aware of stormwater issues and to implement stormwater BMPs.



Education and Involvement Program
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Public Education

As the agency responsible for managing North Carolina's system of roads, NCDOT has developed strategies and policies to improve stormwater quality throughout the state. We want the citizens of North Carolina to know what we're doing about stormwater runoff from NCDOT's roadways and facilities. NCDOT has many employees across the state who, like you, enjoy fishing, swimming, and boating in our waters. Stormwater pollution affects our North Carolina way of life. That's why we're making every effort to improve the quality of our stormwater runoff. To do this, we'd like to invite you, as informed citizens, to help NCDOT make improvements in our environment. By making simple changes in your everyday activities, you can have a positive impact on water quality. Better water quality means cleaner water for drinking and for recreation. Please slosh on over to the Education page to see how you can make a difference.



Research Program
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NCDOT continues to explore new and innovative technologies that may be suitable for treating specific pollutants and that are compatible with the linear nature of most NCDOT activities. Water quality management practices in use by other state DOTs are being considered as well as the numerous stormwater treatment systems now commercially available.

Research Project NCDOT is conducting and funding research to investigate and evaluate suitable methods for treating pollutants associated with NCDOT activities. Active research programs involving detailed analytical monitoring have been established to investigate and document the impacts of stormwater runoff from highway surfaces as well as to investigate the effectiveness of BMPs in pollutant removal.

Specific information about stormwater-related research can be found on the NCDOT Research and Analysis Program website.




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