News Releases

9/18/2017: Free Resources for Parents to Ensure Children’s Safety

Free Resources for Parents to Ensure Children’s Safety

Posted 9/18/2017 2:39:42 PM

RALEIGH – Every day too many children ride in car seats that have been installed incorrectly, or are riding in the wrong car seats for their ages and sizes. Other children ride while completely unbuckled. Governor Roy Cooper proclaimed September 17-24 as “Child Passenger Safety Week” and September 23 as “Child Passenger Safety Day” in North Carolina to coincide with highway administration’s national campaign and to highlight this important concern. “Safety of our citizens, especially our state’s most valuable asset, our children, is our main priority,” said Dr. Cheryl Leonard, assistant director of the Governor’s Highway Safety Program. “Our goal is to considerably decrease child crash injuries and fatalities though offering child safety seat technicians with the tools to properly educate parents about child restraint and partnering with law enforcement in their commitment in enforcing child passenger safety laws.”  Child Passenger Safety Week aims to bring awareness to parents and caregivers to make sure their children ride as safely as possible, every trip, every time. Child Passenger Safety Day will host “Seat Check Saturday” on Sept. 23, giving parents and caregivers the opportunity to stop at one of 241 permanent checking stations across the state. Certified technicians will check car seats and booster seats to be sure they are properly installed and appropriate for the child’s age, weight and height. The North Carolina Child Passenger Safety Law requires children younger than age 16 to be properly restrained in an age, weight and height appropriate restraint. As a parent, it is imperative that you know how to use your restraints properly. Children should ride rear-facing as long as possible (at least until age 2) up to the top height or weight allowed by their seat. Once your child outgrows the seat’s rear-facing capabilities, the child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness. After outgrowing the forward-facing car seat by height or weight, children should ride in a booster seat until the seat belt fits properly on its own. To learn more about Child Passenger Safety Week, Seat Check Saturday and the state’s occupant restraint laws, visit the GHSP website or BuckleUpNC.org. ***NCDOT***
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12/22/2016: Governor’s Highway Safety Program – A Year of Reducing Traffic-Related Fatalities

Governor’s Highway Safety Program – A Year of Reducing Traffic-Related Fatalities

Posted 12/22/2016 12:47:23 AM

RALEIGH - The North Carolina Governor’s Highway Safety Program made significant strides with several projects and initiatives launched in 2016 to reduce traffic-related crashes and fatalities on our roadways.   “I am proud of what we have been able to accomplish this year in traffic safety,” GHSP Director Don Nail said. “Because of Governor Pat McCrory’s NC Vision Zero initiative, we are now able to bring together multiple agencies and stakeholders to engineer safer roads, educate road users on safe driving practices, and enforce life-saving traffic laws.” The NC Vision Zero initiative utilizes data analytics to guide traffic safety efforts and educate the public. Safety stakeholders, such as state and local law enforcement, are able to use the data to directly link agency enforcement and countermeasure activities.  The initial goal is to reduce roadway fatalities and serious injuries in half in the next 15 years, with a long-term target of zero deaths on North Carolina roadways. In addition to the launch of NC Vision Zero, GHSP funded a total of 109 projects for state, local and nonprofit agencies. These projects focused on several areas that affect highway safety including, but not limited to, alcohol-impaired driving, occupant protection, speeding, young drivers, motorcycle safety, older drivers, school bus safety, pedestrians, bicyclists, and traffic records.  Following are key highlights of GHSP’s program areas: Occupant Protection GHSP reported a record 91.7 percent seatbelt usage rate according to its annual survey conducted by RTI International. This means that more than nine of out 10 North Carolinians are taking the time to buckle up when getting in a motor vehicle. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s standard is 90 percent. North Carolina’s Click It or Ticket campaign is still the national model for education and enforcement programs that remind motorists that wearing a seat belt can save your life. The program, which started 23 years ago, aims to increase driver seatbelt usage rates and reduce fatalities across North Carolina. It has yielded significant results over the years.  Impaired Driving Fatalities resulting from of an impaired driver are down 19.6 percent, compared to 2015, with 329 deaths in North Carolina so far this year. In its 22nd year, the Booze It & Lose It education and enforcement campaign has created increased awareness of the dangers of drinking and driving, as well as the penalties associated with driving while impaired. GHSP has awarded grants to DWI Task Force teams that work nightly to catch impaired drivers. The DWI Task Force teams are in Brunswick, Buncombe, Cumberland, Forsyth, Guilford, Mecklenburg, Robeson, Union, Wake and Wayne counties. GHSP added two new units to the B.A.T. Mobile program, which is a Breath Alcohol Testing vehicle equipped with a mobile lab and a magistrate’s courtroom.  B.A.T. mobile units are used at checkpoints throughout the state to identify and remove impaired drivers from roadways.  GHSP expanded the fleet so that the program can be regionally based and more efficient.  The program is administrated through the Forensic Tests for Alcohol Branch of the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services.   To help with efficient prosecution of impaired driving cases, GHSP funded three Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutors to conduct training for prosecutors, law enforcement, magistrates, judges and other traffic safety professionals.   Motorcycle Safety GHSP sponsors the BikeSafe NC initiative to reduce motorcycle crashes and fatalities.  This program offers training to experienced riders who are interested in improving their riding skills and riding techniques. The training is conducted by law enforcement motor officers in a non-threatening, non-enforcement environment.  There is no charge for these classes.  BikeSafe NC held 145 classes this year in 21 counties training over 490 riders. Education and Enforcement Campaigns GHSP sponsored 17 educational and enforcement campaigns in which 80 percent of law enforcement agencies statewide participated. More than 100 agencies in North Carolina participated in all the campaigns, which include Click It or Ticket, Booze It & Lose It and Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine programs. More than 24,000 saturation patrols were completed, resulting in over 7,000 DWI arrests, 24,000 occupant restraint tickets, 88,000 speeding violations and 5,000 felony arrests.  2017 Preview Looking ahead to 2017 and beyond, GHSP will continue to serve as a leader for improving traffic safety in North Carolina through its own education campaigns and initiatives while funding evidence-based, innovative, and results-oriented programs. The achievements to date have been the result of a wide range of education, enforcement, and other safety initiatives in our state, and can be credited to the hard work and dedication of many agencies and individuals including law enforcement officers, prosecutors, judges, educators, researchers, community groups and safety advocates. “We are confident that our efforts during 2016 and the launch of NC Vision Zero will help accomplish our goal of reducing crashes and saving lives on our streets and highways,” Nail concluded. In March 2017, North Carolina will host the Lifesavers Conference in Charlotte. The conference is the largest meeting of highway safety professionals in the country. More than 2,000 participants will gather for three days to discuss best practices, new initiatives and countermeasures aimed at reducing roadway incidents.
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One of the Governor's Highway Safety Program's  key accomplishments in 2016 was the launch of Governor Pat McCrory's NC Vision Zero initiative to eliminate deaths on North Carolina roadways. ***NCDOT***
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3/24/2016: N.C. Governor’s Highway Safety Program Launches New Enforcement Blitz Against Speeding

N.C. Governor’s Highway Safety Program Launches New Enforcement Blitz Against Speeding

Posted 3/24/2016 11:07:28 AM

Raleigh, NC – The N.C. Governor’s Highway Safety Program (GHSP) is launching its annual speed enforcement blitz from March 24 – April 3 under the tagline: “Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine.” The intensified enforcement effort against speeding drivers underscores the severity of the problem across our state’s roads. Officers will step up enforcement of posted speed limits throughout North Carolina and stop and ticket anyone caught speeding. “Speeding translates to death on our roadways. It greatly reduces a driver’s ability to steer safely around another vehicle, a hazardous object, or an unexpected curve,” said Don Nail, director of the GHSP. “We want to help our state and local law enforcement get out their message Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine to reduce fatalities.” In 2015, speeding was a contributing factor in 23 percent of all fatal crashes in North Carolina and 322 lives were lost in such crashes. During last year’s Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine campaign there were 23 fatalities, including five speed-related deaths. "North Carolina law enforcement remains committed to keeping our highway and roads safe,” said Public Safety Secretary Frank L. Perry. “The N.C. State Highway Patrol does not intend to change its tactics when it comes to enforcing the speed limit. Our troopers still have reasonable discretion when it comes to enforcing our traffic laws. Earlier reports that we would begin ticketing drivers going one or two miles over the speed limit were based on a misinterpretation of the initiative. Troopers and local law enforcement officers will continue to enforce the speed limit." Fully 86 percent of all speeding-related traffic fatalities occur on local roads – where the posted speed limits were 55 miles per hour or under. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a crash on a road with a speed limit of 65 mph or greater is more than twice as likely to result in a fatality than a crash on a road with a speed limit of 45 or 50 mph and nearly five times as likely as a crash on a road with a speed limit of 40 mph or below. About 14 percent of the country’s speeding-related fatalities occur on interstate highways each year. ***NCDOT***
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4/12/2012: “No Need 2 Speed” Nets Nearly 13,500 Speeders

“No Need 2 Speed” Nets Nearly 13,500 Speeders

Posted 4/12/2012 10:53:03 AM

RALEIGH — The Governor’s Highway Safety Program announced today that state and local law enforcement officers cited 13,435 motorists for speeding during the “No Need 2 Speed” Campaign, which ran April 2-8. A total of 39,150 traffic and criminal citations were issued statewide. “State and local law enforcement agencies made a tremendous effort to make our highways safer and to remind motorists to obey the speed limit during this campaign,” said Becky Wallace, director of GHSP. Officers also issued 2,832 safety belt and 426 child passenger safety violations and 1,003 drug charges. In addition, they apprehended 819 fugitives from justice and recovered 51 stolen vehicles. For county-by-county citation totals or more information about “No Need 2 Speed”, visit the Governor's Highway Safety Program website.  ***NCDOT***  
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4/4/2012: There is “No Need 2 Speed” While Traveling

There is “No Need 2 Speed” While Traveling

Posted 4/4/2012 10:54:16 AM

RALEIGH – Speeding is one of the top three causes of crashes on North Carolina’s highways. In an effort to reduce speeds and make our highways safer, the N.C. Governor’s Highway Safety Program along with the state and local law enforcement kicked off the “No Need 2 Speed” campaign on Monday to cite speeders for not obeying speed limits. N.C. SHP along with local police departments and sheriff offices across the state have stepped up patrols on North Carolina’s roads. The stepped up patrols will continue through Sunday, April 8. While you are behind the wheel, remember these tips to get you to your destination safely: Obey the speed limit. In 2011, speeding was a contributing factor in about 33 percent of crashes in North Carolina; those crashes resulted in 428 fatalities and 39,416 injuries; Pay attention. The latest research shows that you are 23 times more likely to crash your vehicle if you text while driving. Other distractions in your vehicle may include eating and drinking, grooming, using a navigation system or adjusting your stereo;  Plan ahead before you leave home so you know where you are going and how long it will take you to get there.  You can visit the travel page on the NCDOT website at http://ncdot.gov/travel/ to learn about road construction, crashes, weather conditions or other incidents that may affect your travel time. Also, you can call 511, North Carolina’s toll-free travel information line, for real-time alerts and updates.    Dangerous driving can be reported to local law enforcement by dialing 911 from anywhere in the state. For more information on “No Need 2 Speed”, go to the Governor's Highway Safety Program website. ***NCDOT***
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