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Work Zone Statistics

​2016 Fast Facts

  • Across North Carolina, there were 5,831 work zone crashes.
  • As a result of motor vehicle crashes, 3,095 people were injured in construction, utility and maintenance work zones across the state.
  • Twenty-six people – 24 travelers and two workers – died in North Carolina work zones.
  • Speeding and distracted driving accounted for more than 50 percent of all work zone crashes in the state.
  • Nearly 80 percent of reported work zone crashes in the state occurred on clear days.
  • Eighty-eight percent of reported work zone crashes in North Carolina occurred during dry road conditions.
  • More than 75 percent of reported work zone crashes occurred during daylight hours.

Source: Traffic Engineering Accident Analysis System/North Carolina Crash Database


Additional Statistics

It takes 49 seconds longer to travel through a 2-mile work zone at 45 mph than at 65 mph hour. The potential benefits of speeding don't outweigh the risks.

According to N.C. Department of Transportation research from 2010-2015:

  • People ages 18-34 comprise 38 percent of all crashes.

  • People ages 25-24 comprise 29 percent of all crashes.

  • People 18-24 years old are twice as likely to be in a work zone crash as those in any other age group.

  • About 69 percent of all crashes involve the driver of the vehicle.

  • About 55 percent of those involved in work zone crashes are males

  • About 52 percent of crashes are in a passenger car

  • About 67 percent of crashes are in metropolitan area; 33 percent are in rural areas

  • Most crashes happen between noon and 6 p.m. with the largest percentage from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. More crashes happen from May through November, with October being the biggest month on average.

Source: N.C. Department of Transportation Research: N.C. Reportable Work Zone Crashes 2010-2015

Crashes by Age

​Age​% Involved in Crashes
​17 and under​14.2
​18-21​11.2
​22-24​7.7
​25-29​10.4
​30-34​8.6
​35-39​7.8
​40-49​14.8
​50-59​12.1
​60-69​7.9
​70-79​3.8
​80 and older ​1.5


4/16/2018 4:29 PM

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